Genome 562

Population Genetics

Winter, 2009


News about the course

These news items have the newest ones last.


Description from the UW Course Catalog

GENOME 562 Population Genetics
Credits: 4
Quarters: Sp
Instructor: Felsenstein
Course Desc.: Mathematical and experimental approaches to the genetics of natural populations, especially as they relate to evolution. Emphasis on theoretical population genetics. Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Offered: Sp.


What are some other related courses?

The UW has great strength is evolutionary genetics and statistical genetics. Some relevant courses are:

Biology 354
The main evolution course at the University, taught this quarter by Billie Swalla, who is a very well-known researcher in evolution of development (``evo-devo''), and Spring quarter by Carl Bergstrom, whose research on animal communication spans experimental and theoretical approaches. Textbook is Barton et al. "Evolution".
Genome 570
This is my graduate-level course on Phylogenetic Inference. Methods for inferring phylogenies, and methods for doing things with them. Some background in statistics necessary. It will be given every other Winter (in even-numbered years).
Statistics/Biostatistics 550-551-552
The core course series for the UW's outstanding Statistical Genetics program. The three courses are:
550
Statistical Genetics I: Mendelian traits. Offered each Winter and Spring, by Elizabeth Thompson, who is a major figure (one can say a major force) in development of statistical genetics methodology, and by Volodymir Minin, a rising star in areas overlapping statistical genetics and molecular evolution.
551
Statistical Genetics II: Quantitative Traits. Offered each Autumn by Bruce Weir. Bruce has had a long and distinguished career in statistical genetics, formerly at North Carolina State University.
552
Statistical Genetics III: Design and Analysis. Offered each Winter by Ellen Wijsman (Medical Genetics and Biostatistics) who is a well-known statistical geneticist.
Others
There are more courses and I'll gradually try to put descriptions of them here. Some faculty members in this area (evolutionary genetics) are Bruce Weir (Biostatistics), Mary Kuhner (Genome Sciences), Josh Akey (Genome Sciences), Phil Green (Genome Sciences), Willie Swanson (Genome Sciences), Carl Bergstrom (Biology), Ben Kerr (Biology), Elizabeth Thompson (Statistics), Vladimir Minin (Statistics) and Ellen Wijsman (Medical Genetics and Biostatistics).

What are some Internet resources on evolutionary biology?

There are many:

Blogs and Newsgroups

There are blogs, mostly creation / evolution debating, and some Usenet newsgroups. The latter are accessible through Google Groups.

Some brief descriptions of some of the major ones covering evolution:

Panda's Thumb (Blog)
Blog defending evolutionary biology against creationists and advocates of Intelligent Design.
Uncommon Descent (Blog)
Blog centered around William Dembski and Denyse O'Leary, critics of evolutionary biology and advocates of Intelligent Design.
sci.bio.evolution (Usenet newsgroup)
Moderated by Josh Hayes, formerly of our own Center for Quantitative Sciences, who should get some sort of award for putting up with a lot of nonsense. I think it was intended as a forum for discussion among researchers, but has tended to be filled with postings by amateurs, including some high-volume cranks. In among them are some people with serious knowledge. Not intended for evolution/creation debates: Josh screens these out.
talk.origins (Usenet newsgroup)
The arena for endless debate between creationists and others, with frequent digressions into theology (or maybe it's for discussion of theology with occasional digressions into biology). Extremely high noise to signal ratio. When a decisive point is made, the opponent changes the subject or just refuses to respond. The pro-evolution posters generally do a good job.
sci.bio.paleontology (Usenet newsgroup)
Tends to be filled with postings by fossil enthusiasts and tends to be dinosaur-centered. Some creation/evolution debating too.

Web Pages


Where can I get a copy of the genetic simulation program?

The program is freely distributable. It is available from my server. There you will find source code, documentation and executables for Windows, Mac OS X, and Unix workstations: To fetch any of these Click here. It will show a page which then allows you to download the program.


this page maintained fitfully by Joe Felsenstein